A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

CCTV



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 13th 20, 08:04 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 815
Default CCTV

Can anyone recommend a wireless IP camera that works without needing to
talk to a server somewhere at a cost, and itself doesn't cost the earth?
I want to be able to view its output from my phone.

Ideally the camera should be waterproof so it can be outside, and need
only a power supply from a wall-wart. I don't need an internal SD card
for storage, and I don't need it to be remotely moveable, just have a
lens and some IR LEDs for night-time.

TIA


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com
  #2  
Old February 14th 20, 01:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 91
Default CCTV

"Woody" wrote in message
...
Can anyone recommend a wireless IP camera that works without needing to
talk to a server somewhere at a cost, and itself doesn't cost the earth? I
want to be able to view its output from my phone.

Ideally the camera should be waterproof so it can be outside, and need
only a power supply from a wall-wart. I don't need an internal SD card for
storage, and I don't need it to be remotely moveable, just have a lens and
some IR LEDs for night-time.


We have a couple of Foscam F18910W cameras which are a few years old now.
The picture quality isn't brilliant and the lens focus changes between
visible light and IR (so you have to focus manually for one or the other -
there's no remote electronic adjustment). I'm not sure how waterproof they
a I've only ever used them indoors. They are remotely moveable, so that's
a feature which you don't actually need, but could come in handy. They are
powered from mains wall-warts.

They present a web interface on a LAN IP address - you either configure the
cameras to use a static IP or else (a better solution) configure your router
to reserve a fixed IP address.

The cameras come with a dynamic DNS entry so ds1234.myfoscam.org (for some
value of 1234) automatically points to your router's WAN IP when accessed
from outside your LAN. It requires setting up port forwarding in the router
to allow (for example) ds1234.myfoscam.org:81 and ds1234.myfoscam.org:82 of
your WAN IP to redirect to 192.168.1.2:80 and 192.168.1.3:80 respectively.

  #3  
Old February 14th 20, 02:02 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham J[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 334
Default CCTV

NY wrote:
"Woody" wrote in message
...
Can anyone recommend a wireless IP camera that works without needing
to talk to a server somewhere at a cost, and itself doesn't cost the
earth? I want to be able to view its output from my phone.

Ideally the camera should be waterproof so it can be outside, and need
only a power supply from a wall-wart. I don't need an internal SD card
for storage, and I don't need it to be remotely moveable, just have a
lens and some IR LEDs for night-time.


We have a couple of Foscam F18910W cameras which are a few years old
now. The picture quality isn't brilliant and the lens focus changes
between visible light and IR (so you have to focus manually for one or
the other - there's no remote electronic adjustment). I'm not sure how
waterproof they a I've only ever used them indoors. They are remotely
moveable, so that's a feature which you don't actually need, but could
come in handy. They are powered from mains wall-warts.

They present a web interface on a LAN IP address - you either configure
the cameras to use a static IP or else (a better solution) configure
your router to reserve a fixed IP address.

The cameras come with a dynamic DNS entry so ds1234.myfoscam.org (for
some value of 1234) automatically points to your router's WAN IP when
accessed from outside your LAN. It requires setting up port forwarding
in the router to allow (for example) ds1234.myfoscam.org:81 and
ds1234.myfoscam.org:82 of your WAN IP to redirect to 192.168.1.2:80 and
192.168.1.3:80 respectively.


Or you can have a static public IP provided by your ISP and configure
your router for port forwarding tothe camera.

If you can get one with PoE it may be better to run outdoor grade Cat5
cable (maximum 100 metres length) to the camera - this avoids the
unreliability of WiFi, and doesn't require the camera's location to have
mains power.


--
Graham J
  #4  
Old February 14th 20, 04:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 91
Default CCTV

"Graham J" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:
"Woody" wrote in message
...
Can anyone recommend a wireless IP camera that works without needing to
talk to a server somewhere at a cost, and itself doesn't cost the earth?
I want to be able to view its output from my phone.

Ideally the camera should be waterproof so it can be outside, and need
only a power supply from a wall-wart. I don't need an internal SD card
for storage, and I don't need it to be remotely moveable, just have a
lens and some IR LEDs for night-time.


We have a couple of Foscam F18910W cameras which are a few years old now.
The picture quality isn't brilliant and the lens focus changes between
visible light and IR (so you have to focus manually for one or the
other - there's no remote electronic adjustment). I'm not sure how
waterproof they a I've only ever used them indoors. They are remotely
moveable, so that's a feature which you don't actually need, but could
come in handy. They are powered from mains wall-warts.

They present a web interface on a LAN IP address - you either configure
the cameras to use a static IP or else (a better solution) configure your
router to reserve a fixed IP address.

The cameras come with a dynamic DNS entry so ds1234.myfoscam.org (for
some value of 1234) automatically points to your router's WAN IP when
accessed from outside your LAN. It requires setting up port forwarding in
the router to allow (for example) ds1234.myfoscam.org:81 and
ds1234.myfoscam.org:82 of your WAN IP to redirect to 192.168.1.2:80 and
192.168.1.3:80 respectively.


Or you can have a static public IP provided by your ISP and configure your
router for port forwarding tothe camera.


Yes, having a static WAN IP avoids the need to use DDNS for URL-to-IP
mapping. Either way, you still need to set up port fowarding.

If you can get one with PoE it may be better to run outdoor grade Cat5
cable (maximum 100 metres length) to the camera - this avoids the
unreliability of WiFi, and doesn't require the camera's location to have
mains power.


Assuming that camera supports power over Ethernet. I don't think mine does,
though I don't have any way of injecting power into an Ethernet cable from a
remote point so I can test it.

I always prefer to use Ethernet rather than wifi for anything if there's the
choice ;-) If it involves drilling holes through walls or ceilings to run
Cat 5, wifi is usually considerably easier...

  #5  
Old February 14th 20, 04:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham J[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 334
Default CCTV

NY wrote:

[snip]


I always prefer to use Ethernet rather than wifi for anything if there's
the choice ;-) If it involves drilling holes through walls or ceilings
to run Cat 5, wifi is usually considerably easier...


Easier and reliable are often mutually exclusive !


--
Graham J
  #6  
Old February 14th 20, 04:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 815
Default CCTV

On Fri 14/02/2020 16:16, Graham J wrote:
NY wrote:

[snip]


I always prefer to use Ethernet rather than wifi for anything if
there's the choice ;-) If it involves drilling holes through walls or
ceilings to run Cat 5, wifi is usually considerably easier...


Easier and reliable are often mutually exclusive !


Given an access point is only a few feet away the other side of a wall I
doubt I will have any signal issues!

--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com
  #7  
Old February 14th 20, 04:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 584
Default CCTV

On 14/02/2020 16:17, Woody wrote:

On Fri 14/02/2020 16:16, Graham J wrote:
NY wrote:

I always prefer to use Ethernet rather than wifi for anything if
there's the choice ;-) If it involves drilling holes through walls or
ceilings to run Cat 5, wifi is usually considerably easier...


Easier and reliable are often mutually exclusive !


Given an access point is only a few feet away the other side of a wall I
doubt I will have any signal issues!


But you may have security issues - there have been cases of thieves
and other criminals hacking into WiFi connected security cameras and
using them to spy on the occupants of the house, so that they know when
it's safe to break in! This can't happen with a cabled ethernet connection.


  #8  
Old February 14th 20, 05:04 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
NY[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 91
Default CCTV

"Woody" wrote in message
...
On Fri 14/02/2020 16:16, Graham J wrote:
NY wrote:
I always prefer to use Ethernet rather than wifi for anything if there's
the choice ;-) If it involves drilling holes through walls or ceilings
to run Cat 5, wifi is usually considerably easier...


Easier and reliable are often mutually exclusive !


True. Going between one room and another by Ethernet involves drilling a
hole through a wall, big enough to take an RJ45 plug as well as the cable
(I've tried IDC plugs that you crimp onto the wires, but it was incredibly
fiddly to get all the wires to stay in the right order as I crimped), or
else relies on running Cat 5 through doorways under the metal strip between
one carpet and another. At least the modern flat Cat 5 is easier to hide
under the edge of a carpet or a metal doorway strip than the older round fat
cable.

Given an access point is only a few feet away the other side of a wall I
doubt I will have any signal issues!


Don't bet on it. My laptop (which I'm currently using as a backup PVR for
times when we need to record a second overlapping programme) is about 2 feet
from the router with nothing in the way. But for copying or reading
recordings by SMB share, the transfer rate is *very* slow by wifi compared
with Ethernet. Over wifi, when copying a 1 GB file, the laptop usually
reports about 70-80 Mbps and achieves a maximum of about 30% usage of that
70-80 Mbps (as reported by Task Manager | Networking), whereas over Ethernet
it reports 1 Gbps and achieves about 90-100% usage. And whereas over
Ethernet it's a pretty constant flat-out transfer rate, over wifi it's up
and down and all over the place in a roughly sawtooth pattern wrt time, with
a period of about 10 seconds.

Maybe it's a dodgy wifi adaptor in my laptop; if I had a USB one I'd try
that for comparison.

Wifi is great for completely wireless access for low data-rate usage (web
browsing, accessing emails) but for high throughput and 100% "it just works,
no fuss or downtime" I'd go for Ethernet every time.

  #9  
Old February 14th 20, 06:13 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Jeff Layman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 36
Default CCTV

On 14/02/20 16:53, Java Jive wrote:
On 14/02/2020 16:17, Woody wrote:

On Fri 14/02/2020 16:16, Graham J wrote:
NY wrote:

I always prefer to use Ethernet rather than wifi for anything if
there's the choice ;-) If it involves drilling holes through walls or
ceilings to run Cat 5, wifi is usually considerably easier...

Easier and reliable are often mutually exclusive !


Given an access point is only a few feet away the other side of a wall I
doubt I will have any signal issues!


But you may have security issues - there have been cases of thieves
and other criminals hacking into WiFi connected security cameras and
using them to spy on the occupants of the house, so that they know when
it's safe to break in! This can't happen with a cabled ethernet connection.


Out of interest, could you use a powerline adaptor to carry the signal
from, for example, the loft to anywhere in the house? That might limit
the holes needed for the Ethernet cable to just one - from the loft to
the camera (on the assumption that there is usually a ring main cable
accessible in the loft) to connect one powerline adaptor to. Also, the
powerline to powerline transmission is encrypted, so hacking is unlikely.

--

Jeff
  #10  
Old February 14th 20, 06:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris Green
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 286
Default CCTV

NY wrote:
"Woody" wrote in message
...
On Fri 14/02/2020 16:16, Graham J wrote:
NY wrote:
I always prefer to use Ethernet rather than wifi for anything if there's
the choice ;-) If it involves drilling holes through walls or ceilings
to run Cat 5, wifi is usually considerably easier...

Easier and reliable are often mutually exclusive !


True. Going between one room and another by Ethernet involves drilling a
hole through a wall, big enough to take an RJ45 plug as well as the cable


Not really, it's not that difficult to DIY etherenet UTP cables, all
you have to do is thread the cable and then crimp the RJ45 on the end.

(I've tried IDC plugs that you crimp onto the wires, but it was incredibly
fiddly to get all the wires to stay in the right order as I crimped), or


Ah, sorry, just do it a few times and it becomes easier.

--
Chris Green

 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Compatibility of 2.4Ghz Router with 2.4Ghz CCTV Howard Neil uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 7 April 7th 06 09:47 AM
CCTV over internet TX2 uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 27 November 8th 03 10:09 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2020 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.